Top Tips for Tropical Climate Holidays

download (9)Looking to go on holiday to somewhere with a tropical or sub-tropical climate?

If so, following some of the following tips might be useful and help you to enjoy yourself even more.

  1. Don’t over-economise on your luxury accommodation at the resort. Tropical can mean high humidity at some times of the year and however much you love sun and warmth, you’ll want great pool and air conditioning facilities to allow you to sometimes escape and freshen up. Some ‘bargain-basement’ holiday accommodation might be disappointing in those respects.
  1. Take it easy for a day or two after arrival. Allow your body to acclimatise to its surroundings rather than rushing off to try and climb that hill in the distance right after your hotel check-in
  1. Keep yourself hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Keep alcohol to very sensible/modest levels due to its natural de-hydrating effects, as they’ll be exacerbated by the heat.
  1. Avoid very demanding swimming objectives unless you’re fit. Heat can be exhausting and even strong swimmers can sometimes find themselves in trouble if they’ve pushed themselves a little too far in hot conditions. That can be an even more significant risk if your fitness isn’t perhaps what it should be.
  1. Comply with those now very (or should be very) familiar medical tips relating to barrier creams and protecting yourself from over-exposure to the sun. Remember that a hat is often almost essential – even if you’re not usually someone that wears one.
  1. Think about that siesta. Many peoples around the world who live and work in hot and tropical climates will take it easy for 2-3 hours during the early to mid-afternoon when the temperature is at its highest. Find a tree by the pool or on the beach then park yourself with a book or have a gentle snooze – rather than trying to start playing football.
  1. Take local expert advice on insect protection. Actually, the risks here in many tropical areas are often hugely exaggerated by urban myth and very poor scaremongering advice from people who might never even have visited the destination! Even so, think about repellents etc. Sometimes ordinary common-sense is far more important that repellent compounds.
  1. Obey local safety instructions. This, of course, applies even in your local park back home! Nevertheless, tropical holiday destinations often incorporate beautiful nature and local wildlife. Local specialists will have provided safety advice when touring and sightseeing and that needs to be obeyed. Those who don’t because they ‘think they know better’ are often a danger to themselves and others around them.
  1. Research the local weather patterns. Some times in the year are a little hotter, cooler or wetter/dryer than others on average. You can select average conditions that are most suited to your requirements and preferences etc.
  1. Avoid heavy meals. Packing away big plates of carbohydrates in tropical conditions is likely to leave you feeling very uncomfortable and lethargic. Most local people tend to incline towards lighter meals taken in the evenings when it’s cool although very light snacking during the day is more commonplace (and sometimes necessary for an energy boost) and particularly so if you’ve only eaten a light lunch.